Wildlife , Forest Laws

Blind Hippo in Indian ‘Jumbo Circus’ Needs Help! - Abhishek Kadyan

Posted by Naresh Kadyan on October 24, 2011

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https://mail.google.com/mail/?ui=2&ik=78e2f48d9b&view=att&th=13330577813f7f55&attid=0.1&disp=inline&realattid=f_gu5b69do0&zw

A blind hippo called 'Raja' in India is in trouble and needs your help.The hippo, along with other animals, are being abused in an Indian Circus called “JumboCircus.”  Both the hippos’ teeth eyes need immediate veterinary treatment. The animal was found without care ina congested box with dirty water and with no space for exercise or movement during the visit of the Delhi Zoo Veterinarian, he was deputed by the Central Zoo Authority of India on the complaint lodged by the founder Chairman of the People for Animals (PFA) Haryana Naresh Kadyan, Master Trainer to the Animal Welfare Board of India, representing OIPA in India, Whenconfronted by Naresh Kadyan, the Manager of the circus sent him away and hewas not allowed to be present during the Veterinarian inspection, where as Miss Sukanya Kadyan, Director Events of the OIPA in India demanding that a Medical Board should be constituted at once to inspect all performing animals including eye, teeth surgeon, representative of the AWBI / CZA / WCCB along with the representatives of the NGO's In additionto the hippo, Kadyan saw exotic birds performing without any records, which requiresinvestigation by the Wildlife Crime Control Bureau. He also saw cats and dogsinbreeding, which goes against government legislation, docking tails of a dog is an offense but Jumbo circus have many docked tail dogs to perform, where as AWBI registered these dogs as performing animals, which needs attention, cancellation as well. Elephants are being abused by the iron ankush during performance but use of iron ankush is banned by the Rajasthan High Court (Jaipur Bench), order passed on the public interest litigation no. 8987 of 2006 moved by Naresh Kadyan during Elephant polo sponsored by the Cartier and Elephant family.


Kadyan from OIPA hasfiled grievances with the Wildlife Crime Control Bureau (Government of India),Animal Welfare Board of India, Central Zoo Authority of India, Chief Wildlife Wardenof Haryana, the District Administration, the President of India’s Secretariat andthe Government of Haryana and is currently awaiting action from these entities. He has contacted them regarding theblatant violations of the Prevention ofCruelty to Animals Act, 1960 / CITES and the WildlifeProtection Act, 1972 made by Jumbo Circus.  Kadyan has requested the confiscation of allof these animals after legal action is taken against Jumbo Circus.


OIPA is asking that concerned animal advocates around theworld sign a petition to the Indian authorities demanding that action be taken againthe Managing Partners of Jumbo Circus for the violations of these Acts.Specifically, the petition states:


“Whereas Jumbo circus have many docked tails dogs, unregistered cats, Camels, horses, Elephants andblind hippo to perform, so all these animals may kindly be rescued and FIRagainst owners of the Jumbo circus stationed at Panipat in Haryana, adjoin g area of the National capital, may be lodged for theviolation of the section 3, 11, 38 of the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act,1960 read with the Wildlife Protection Act, 1972 and 428-429 IPC. PFA Haryana–www.pfaharyana.in is ready to rehabilitate all rescued animals during courttrials.”


Please help by signing the petition,and adding a personal comment to your signature. For more information about OIPA in India, visit their website, as well as Peoplefor Animals (PFA) Haryana


Wildlife , Forest Laws

Protected areas vs. poverty and resource profit

Posted by Dr.Susan Sharma on June 04, 2011

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(This blog was posted by 'tarientree' on 11 Oct 2010 15:11 in the discussion forum of 'connecttoearth')

I am living in a well developed country and I think most of you, as you are having access to internet, do as well. We can think about protecting areas and wish there are more such all over the globe. But do we really know and can we even comprehend, how it is, when there is war in the country? Or if we would be so poor, that we must get our food out of the bush? I read about Africa and national parks there. Nationalvparks in countries in war are sometimes almost empty of game, because people go hunting for their food supply. Parkbrangers get killed or corrupted. I do not mean the ivory or trophy hunters, allthough they are a major problem as well. If they would have a better perspective, they would do otherwise.

I think, protecting nature habitats is only effectively achievable, if the people around and in this area have everything to live and therefore can be made sensible for sustainable handling of their land through education. But even this is very hard to achieve, because the well developed countries (Europe, USA, meanwhile parts of China, etc.) take their resources where ever they can get them - and this would be in the underdeveloped countries. The people there get nothing than total nature destruction and health problems, they do not see a cent the incredible earnings the foreigners get.

The mentality of rich and well developed countries like USA can best be seen in Alaska. A national park should be a strongly protected area, right? But oil drilling is allowed! So what is this protected area for then? It is only valid as long it does not concur with capital interests, this means, if the area has no resources or is uneconomic, only then it can be well protected.

So how can we effectively protect nature? The answer is wide spread and not achievable in short-term, if even ever:

* Leaving fossile energy beyond and invest in renewable energy, especially in "free" solar energy so that destroying natural habitats and exploiting of Third World countries is no longer economically of any interest..

    * Elect politicians with natures interest and not economic interest (this means, if they promise you work and good development, it is pure economical thinking). So if you are egoistic (which is natural) you would first choose your own convenience and only then followed by nature preservation, right?

    * Sensible consumption behaviour (organic, MSC, FSC, etc.)
    * Stop rich countries exploitation in countries, where the population is poor and only a very view are rich through sale of their resources (China, USA, Europe, Russia --> Africa, Eastern Europe, South-America)
    * Why need gold and diamonds on your neck or arm? For status? Get rid of this thinking - it is only a material, which makes other people rich, when you buy it.
    * Ask where your sorted out computer, TV or mobile-phone is recycled or trashed. (Does it end up in Africa to be pulled apart for gold and copper by children?)

There is so much more which would be necessary, but most of it would mean, that global economy and globalization need to be completely renewed. The current behaviour of mankind means complete destruction of nature and leaving some small isles of protected areas for a while.

Wildlife , Forest Laws

What can we do to save our environment

Posted by yuvneet on November 06, 2010

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Its so important to stop burning remains of crops still 95% of our farmers burn there remains which produce CO2 and causes maximum damage to our environment ......these gases deposits in upper region of atmosphere and damage maximum crops ....and forest diversities 
So please stop these peoples to burn all such things these are destroying our forests and wild animals too

Wildlife , Forest Laws

Kirigalpoththa

Posted by Kirigalpoththa on June 22, 2010

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Kirigalpoththa- A walk through a magical island

Kirigalpoththa is the second highest mountain in Sri Lanka. It is one of the best hiking routes in the island.

This blog updates on exciting places for hiking and camping in the country and also tries to share information on some of the best routes and beautiful locations in Sri Lanka.

URL - http://kirigalpoththa.blogspot.com/


Wildlife , Forest Laws

Forest Department Culling Little Cormorants

Posted by Susan Sharma on September 06, 2009

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The following news item which appeared in The Hindu today, should make all of us sit up and take notice. Conservation is the most complex subject-It is only when environmentalists and the common man ( here the fishermen) sit together, can solutions emerge. Otherwise the reactions are bound to be knee-jerk. Or at best imported from a situation elsewhere, where the realities might be very different.

http://www.hindu.com/2009/09/07/stories/2009090753550400.htm

 

Wildlife , Forest Laws

Wildlife Habitat

Posted by Susan Sharma on December 06, 2007

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The rate at which devlopment is taking place , especially in less developed countries like India, forests and wetlands are lost even before we have explored and indexed the wildlife living in those areas.

So no wonder that many of us feel that time has come to save all wildlife in forests, wetlands and oceans. In other words let us save the habitat and not just the species in the habitat we know is endangered.

Wildlife , Forest Laws

National Board for Wildlife

Posted by Susan Sharma on June 15, 2007

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The National Board for Wildlife has been reconstituted with the following members. The members are Mahendra Vyas, Brijendra Singh, Divyabhanu Chavda, Dr. Ranjit Sinh, Biswajit Mohanty, Sekhar Dattatri, Bonani Kakkar, Dr. Bhibah Talukdar,Dilip Khatau and Valmik Thapar. WPSI, Reef Watch, Wildlife First, WWF-Iand BNHS are the instituional members.

Wildlife , Forest Laws

CEC term is coming to an end

Posted by Susan Sharma on May 27, 2007

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The Centrally Empowered Committee (CEC) has made many significant interventions where forests lands are concerned.  It has gone against the wishes of the Ministry of Environment and Forests(MoEF) many times, and rejected proposals that would endanger India’s already dwindling forest cover. 
The term of CEC is unlikely to be renewed, sources say.


The proposed environment tribunal bill  being set up is expected to be peopled with " yes men", to ensure that Environment Impact Studies go through speedily.  To ensure that the concerns of environment and of people are addressed, activists may turn to public Interest Litigation more than ever. 

source" The Hindu", 23 March, 2007

Wildlife , Forest Laws

Constitutional Provisions in India

Posted by Susan Sharma on May 17, 2007

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Article 48A and Part IV A of the Constitution grant environment supremacy over development. The Constitution, on a sensitive provision in Article 48A states:"The State shall endeavour to protect and improve the environment and to safeguard the forests and wildlife of the country."

Article 51A (g) creates a fundamental duty in every individual to obey the mandates of environment and ecology.

Wildlife , Forest Laws

Environmental Law

Posted by Susan Sharma on May 16, 2007

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Environmental law in India has developed partly in response to demands by environmental groups and partly as a result of international conventions. The laws to protect bio diversity were a direct outcome of the International Convention on Biodiversity.

After the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro, a number of laws were changed or new rules drafted to conform to international agreements. Local environment groups played an important role in bringing in the Coastal Regulation Zone Rules, an outcome of growing awareness of the impact of development along the coasts of marine resources.

Sourece: The Hindu, 23, March, 2007

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