Anthropomorphism

Oriental White Eye

Posted by Susan Sharma on October 19, 2016

Blog
Bird brains? You will change your mind after watching this video.

Anthropomorphism

Tiger Death Statistics

Posted by Soumya Banerjee on August 16, 2015

Blog

Recently, several articles were brought out highlighting the loss of 41 tigers from India’s forests over the first 7 months of 2015. A variety of causes were responsible for these deaths, ranging from infighting, to poisoning and killing for skin and bones by professional poachers.
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/environment/flora-fauna/india-loses-41-tigers-in-7-months/articleshow/48446348.cms
However, what does this say about the efficacy of India’s tiger conservation programme? Wildlife scientists have always held that tiger populations experience high turnovers-they are prolific breeders, but also die young. This may be borne out by the reasonably high number of annual tiger deaths recorded over the past few years-61(2014), 76(2013), 89(2012), 56(2011) and 53(2010). Intensive monitoring of tiger populations actually tells us that the recorded death figures are actually a fraction of the total number of deaths. If populations are adequately from adverse factors such as habitat loss, poaching and conflict, then the naturally high rate of reproduction will ensure that tiger populations continue to thrive.
Which is  what brings us to the next question- how indicative are these deaths of the effects  human-induced adversities on tiger populations ? The likely answer is- that they present a highly incomplete picture. For instance, only 3 seizures of tiger parts have been made from poachers this year; the figure was 12 in 2014. However, independent investigations indicate that only a small percentage of seizures come to light.

A tiger skin being seized from poachers.  Credit : Telegraph IndiaA tiger skin being seized from poachers.
Credit : Telegraph India

. Official investigations into such deaths are also marked by a lack of transparency. Officials are usually very keen to make it look like as if every instance of tiger death is a result of natural causes, which often causes many instances of tiger poisoning to be swept under the carpet. Many carcasses are recovered in an advanced state of decomposition; which, coupled with a shortage of adequately trained vets, means that the actual causes of death are determined in only a very small number of cases. Details of investigations into tiger deaths are still awaited in as many as 33 of the aforementioned 41 cases.

An investigation into a tiger death in progress in Mudumalai Tiger Reserve.  Credit : The HinduAn investigation into a tiger death in progress in Mudumalai Tiger Reserve.
Credit : The Hindu

Wild tigers continue to be threatened by innumerable factors ; but tiger death statistics alone cant quantify these threats.

Anthropomorphism

Excelling the PAIN

Posted by Amina Bibi on August 01, 2015

Blog
The monsoon rain started during November, 2014 – the initial rains were good. When the rain poured non-stop for a fortnight destroyed vegetable cultivation. So it happened to the kitchen garden of my neighbor too. The entire kitchen garden with Amaranthus, Okra, cluster beans, beans and gourds could not withstand the water stagnation. The papaya tree laden with fifty big papayas and fifty small papayas could no more stand straight. The tree fall with the fruit bearing tip broken. They were about to severe the entire tree, I happen to watch it over from my windows and stopped it. I immediately rushed to the plant and asked to find supportive poles and make the papaya plant straight as much as possible.

February 2015 gave me a surprise with three tine buds from the node little lower than the broken edge of the papaya tree. I was so excited and felt very much encouraged, as the tree spoke me to EXCEL THE PAIN. It became a non-voluntary action to see the plant every day in the morning. In the month of April, buds turned into branches but there were heavy infestations of Papaya Mealybug (Paracoccus marginatus). I asked them to remove the infected leaves often. They turned frustrated asking me is the bug coming to your house. Then I explained about the mealybug and could be controlled by manual removal of the leaves, luckily there were no infestation of the bug in any of the other plants nearby.


Now during July, I was amazed to see the papaya tree with three branches, all the three loaded with papayas big and small. What made me wonder is, “the plant which could not bear the load of a single plant is now capable of its triple bearing – from many nodes there are two, three or five papayas”. What a lesson the MIRACLE papaya tree taught me - ENDURE THE PAIN, WORK HARD and BE SINCERE, withstand all the odd situations and one day surprising results turn all the agony into glee.

Anthropomorphism

to save our nature

Posted by chaithanya on December 06, 2013

Blog
I always wanted to save nature for our future and the comming generation. I feel to save nature is easy but all us should think in a better way. there are lot of r's to save nature but we are not doing so. we waste things in one or the other way.we dispose the disposablewaste in such a manner that it may get spoilt.for examples, like papers,we crush it through it and never use again! i want is that the world should stop using garbage and the people who dont should be severly punished. reduce,reuse and recycle are the only way to conserve our planet motherearth.

Anthropomorphism

www.wildslife.com

Posted by hariom on November 06, 2013

Blog
This is new india wildlife site .i want to sell this site . contact at hariom.sharma151@gmail.com

Anthropomorphism

LIVING with SNAKES

Posted by Vattam Adithya on March 11, 2013

Blog

IVattam Adithya from Bellary, Karnataka State, and administrator in indiansnakes.org& a snake rescuer since 15 years, have rescued more than 6500 odd snakes& released them into safe habitats. I have conducted many awarenessprogrammes on snakes to general public & school children reliving theirminds of the many myths about snakes. Now I have started a program called LIVING with SNAKES. Some of you mightbe perplexed by the context. Instead of rescuing non-venomous like Rat snakes,red sand boa’s, trinket snake, Green vine snake, Wolf snake from humanhabitats, we plan to leave them where they are. This might sound ridiculous andstupid but we have got results by explaining the people about the advantage ofhaving these snakes in their surroundings.

 A week back I rescued an 8 foot rat snake froma rice mill and later asked the mill owner weather I can come back to the millwith the snake & explain the advantageous of having a snake like this inhis mill. He was silent for a moment and then asked me to come over. The verynext day I was there, all the 30 odd workers gathered around me & I startedexplaining the facts & advantageous of the snake. That it is a non venomoussnake, it eats more than 400 rats per year & easy to handle I even showedthem how to identify the snake by showing them some key features about thespecies, one of them came forward & asked me weather he too can handle thesnake I said it’s absolutely safe. He right away took the snake into his hands,later all the 30 odd workers there started handling the snake. There werepresent the Mill owner & his children they too enjoyed handling the snake.

            After sometime I put forth the ideaof releasing the snake in their mill & to my astonishment everyone agreedto my plan took the snake in their hands & released it into stakes ofpaddy. We now want to spread this idea across, to all the other mills in ourplace & hopefully across India.

            They too have the right to livealong side us like all other animals like dogs, pigs, cattle, cats &monkeys. These animals are also potentially dangerous & spread diseases butstill we live harmoniously alongside them. Snakes don’t spread any diseases &we can live alongside some species of snakes. They seldom attack people. Theyonly strike or bite when threatened or cornered when they have no place to fleeor else the first thing the snake does on sight of a human is flee.      

Anthropomorphism

Wild Life

Posted by Jasoprakas Debdas on September 08, 2012

Blog

Anthropomorphism

Friendship of elephants

Posted by Susan Sharma on August 06, 2011

Blog

Study author Dr Shermin de Silva from the University of Pennsylvania said: ‘Elephants are able to track one another over large distances by calling to each other and using their sense of smell.

‘So the “herd” of elephants one sees at any given time is often only a fragment of a much larger social group.

‘Our work shows that they are able recognize their friends and renew these bonds even after being apart for a long time.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2019178/Elephants-forget-old-friends-social-network-experts.html#ixzz1UJcpL21q

Anthropomorphism

share something

Posted by sushil kumar on May 31, 2010

Blog
      this is sushil from chandigarh, i have made a shrort wildlife film on ghariyal i want to screening it in film fest through iwc.

Anthropomorphism

From a green barbet

Posted by Susan Sharma on February 26, 2010

Blog
We, barbets are great at home building. Apart from finding something to eat, pecking a hole on the tree keeps us occupied for the best part of our life. (After all we are related to the famous woodpeckers!) When this neat hole on a wild neem tree was complete, we had reason to be proud of our handy work. We managed raising two broods inside during the summer months and our chicks are now grown up and flying about on their own. During winter, we normally fly away to warmer climes, what are wings for anyway. It seemed appropriate to rent out our premises to other needy folks. But look at what the ants have made of it. They are really dirty housekeepers. When the squirrels came and cleaned up the mess, we were happy. The squirrel kids were snug and warm for the winter. Not one but two families lived inside. The parakeets need a spacious bungalow and are now checking out the squirrel home. We barbets are sitting on the fence and watching the fight between the parakeet and the squirrel. Hey, but why is the tree looking shrivelled up? The squirrels have been extending the house illegally from inside, eating away the sap inside. Looking at the withering tree, we know that it will not be able to weather the next winter storm. May be it is time for us to move on to another tree! (The more you observe nature, the more you tend to identify your emotions and feelings with it. That is the reason why I have included this blog under"anthropomorphism")
Page 1 of 2 1 2



Copyright © 2001 - 2017 Indian Wildlife Club. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use