Man Animal Conflict

Conflict taking toll on both humans and animals

Posted by Susan Sharma on May 17, 2011

 
Forum Post

"Man-animal (anthropogenic) conflict in India is taking a heavy toll on habitat

and thereby the survival of wildlife. Habitat fragmentation is leading to

isolation of animals, inbreeding, and causing local extinction of such

species. If wildlife are restricted in their movements and in their sociology

(mating patterns and territoriality) it will lead to inbreeding, further

weakening the genetic pool. This applies to all endangered birds, reptiles,

insects, and mammals.

In early 2010 there was an official alert that 1000 tigers were reduced to

skin and bone since the last census of 2008. The 2008 census said there

1411 tigers remaining. Only 50 percent are females. Of these there are

many which are old and frail, and are not breeding any more. Many other

males are of the same bloodline so mating is impossible. Genetic

inbreeding amongst felines is one of the greatest threats to tiger numbers.

Taking all this into account, only 1/3rd of the 1000 odd tiger population in

India are fit to breed."-Malini Shankar

Read More at

http://www.indiatogether.org/2011/feb/env-manimal.htm

Urban Wildlife

Parakeets Swarm in London

Posted by Susan Sharma on May 17, 2011

 
Forum Post

The once-exotic bird is becoming a notorious pest as it enjoys a population

explosion in many London suburbs.

"There is wide agreement that the Adams and Eves behind the current

population boom did not fly here from Asia or Africa but escaped from

British pet cages or were intentionally released by their owners. The great

mystery is what allowed the parakeets to procreate with such phenomenal

success just in the past decade."

Read more at the link
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/14/science/earth/14parakeet.html?_r=3
or
http://tinyurl.com/5us2w4y

Climate change and Global Warming

National Institute of Himalayan Glaciology

Posted by Susan Sharma on May 06, 2011

 
Forum Post

"Most glaciers are melting, they are retreating; some glaciers, like the Siachen glacier, are advancing. But overall one can say incontrovertibly that the debris on our glaciers is very high, the snow balance is very low. We have to be very cautious because of the water security, particularly in north India, which depends on the health of the Himalayan glaciers," says Jairam Ramesh, Minister for Environment, India.

The new National Institute of Himalayan Glaciology is based in Dehradun, in Uttarakhand, and will monitor glacial changes and compare results with those from glaciers in Pakistan, Nepal and Bhutan.

India has launched the Indian Network on Comprehensive Climate Change Assessment (INCCA)," the Minister said. It will bring together 125 research institutions throughout India, work with international bodies and operate as a "sort of Indian IPCC," he added. The body will publish its own climate assessment in November, 2011, with reports on the Himalayas, India's long coastline, the Western Ghat highlands, and the north-eastern region close to the borders with Bangladesh, Burma, China and Nepal.

Corporates and Environment

Coal mining

Posted by Susan Sharma on April 29, 2011

 
Forum Post

Mountaintop removal coal mining is changing the American landscape on a scale that is hard to comprehend unless you see it from the air. Anyone who has ever flown in a small aircraft over southern West Virginia or eastern Kentucky will never forget the experience of seeing the massive scale of destruction - mountain after mountain blown up and dumped into valleys as far as the eye can see. Mountaintop removal affects more than mountains and streams, however; it is threatening to displace and destroy a distinctly American culture that has persisted in the Appalachian Mountains for generations. Appalachian people working to save their communities have long dreamed of ways to fly reporters, decision-makers, and thousands of other Americans over the Appalachian coalfields to see this destruction first hand - and then to visit their communities to hear stories of people who endure the consequences of what some have called "cheap energy."

Read more at the Link
http://earth.google.com/outreach/cs_app_voices.html

Little Known Destinations

a trip to north-east forests.....

Posted by shayan ghosh on April 13, 2011

 
Forum Post
it's about the forests in jalpaiguri,west bengal.....gorumara,chapramari,chilapota,jaldapara..........lots of greens,lesser no of big cats,huge no of elephants.........as these places are not so famous compared to other forests like-corbett,bandhavgarh etc.,they are not hugely effected by our so called "tourism" & "civilization"......there is also a tiger rescue centre in khayerberi......still can't understand why those leapords are still not sent to jungles,although they have overcome from thier injuries,after being looked after for so many years....is it for tourists???don't know...

Any other

The season of blues-2011

Posted by Dr.Susan Sharma on April 05, 2011

 
Forum Post
The Jacaranda tree is in full bloom Spring is here with cool mornings and evenings. What we call, beautiful weather. When spring comes with a tinge of cold, rather than an abrupt change from cold to hot, the colours are vivid and rare beauties bloom. The month of March, with cricket in every one's mind and can the blues be far behind? The above flower is called bachelor button and it is mostly blue in colour. More bachelors among pink flocks. The iris lily forgot to bloom last year as the summer came swift and strong. But this year one eagerly awaited the blooms hiding inside wrinkled leaves of the lily. But the highlight of the early spring is always the appearance of Common jay butterfly, feeding on the nectar of "Curry Leaves" flowers. The Blue pansy also appears sucking in wet mud and taking a break on the Ashoka leaves. The crowning glory of the season this year, was of course our own blue cricket team who lifted the world cup after 28 years!

General

Cancer and Cateracts

Posted by Tulip Das on March 27, 2011

 
Forum Post
Cancer: Normal cells in the body multiply only when the body needs and die when body does not need them. Cancer appears when the growth of the cells became out of control and cells divide non stop again and again. The cancerous cells (which are also known as malignant cells) forgot how to die. Besides human, animals and other living organisms can get cancer. Cancer can develop almost in every organ or tissue such as colon, breast, lung, skin, bones, or nerve tissues. The various causes of cancer include-1. drinking excess alcohol. 2. genetic problem. 3. obesity. 4. radiation. 5. viruses. 6. excessive sunlight exposure.
But the cause of many cancers remain unknown. Lung cancer is the most common of all cancer- related death. Most of the cancers are diagnosed by biopsy.

Cataracts: Clouding of the lens in eye is referred to cataracts. It affects vision and are very commonly found in older people. cataracts generally grow slowly. some symptoms of cataracts are- 1. Blurry or/and double vision. 2. colors seems faded. 3. Vision not so well at night. 4. glare.
At first stage, some protection measures can help, like- using anti- glare glasses, use of sun glasses, brighter light. Surgery is also done by removing the cloudy lens by replacing it with artificial lens.


Climate change and Global Warming

save trees

Posted by amit sharma on March 25, 2011

 
Forum Post
mere doston,
  laakh koshish karne ke bad bhi hamari sarkarain aur log jungalon aur tiger ko bachane me asafal ho rahe he,,,kyonki kuch log apne matlab ke liye jungal kaatne me lage huain hain..wo log bhavushya ki us tasveer ko nahin dekh paa rahain jab charon taraf viraan aur banjar dharti ka nazara hoga jaise koi vidhwa aurat dikhti hain,,isliye har nagrik ko apna kartavya samajh kar is vishya par gambhir vichar karna chaiye...jaldi bahut jaldi kyonki abhi hamare paas samay aur sampada dono he.......save trees and tigers..

National Parks

kanha

Posted by amit sharma on March 25, 2011

 
Forum Post
i have visit to kanha national park 2 times.i want the save trees and tigers on worldwide level

Environmental Education

Effects Of Radioactive Pollution

Posted by Tulip Das on March 18, 2011

 
Forum Post

Radioactivepollution is very important environmental problem. The effects o radioactivepollution may represent significant health risk to human and other organisms.

 

Ultraviolet(UV) light is actually electromagnetic radiation with very short wave length(i.e; shorter than that of visible light). UV ray damages the cells of corneaand ultimately results to blindness. It also causes blisters and redness o theskin (skin cancer) by damaging the cells of the skin.

 

The effectsof radioactivity generate damage to the gene pool, the genetics of all livingspecies. Genetic damage from radiation effects over life time and generations.

 

The firsteffect of radioactive pollution was noted in the early twentieth century(1909). The miner who were working in uranium mines, suffered from skin burnand cancer. Some of the major biomedical effects of radiation are well known inhistory. During Second World War in Japan (1945), many people were died due toradioactivity of the atom (atomic explosion). Another prominent radioactivedisaster was 1984, Chernobyl, where an atomic power station was met with anaccident.

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