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The season of blues-2011

Posted by Dr.Susan Sharma on April 05, 2011

 
Forum Post
The Jacaranda tree is in full bloom Spring is here with cool mornings and evenings. What we call, beautiful weather. When spring comes with a tinge of cold, rather than an abrupt change from cold to hot, the colours are vivid and rare beauties bloom. The month of March, with cricket in every one's mind and can the blues be far behind? The above flower is called bachelor button and it is mostly blue in colour. More bachelors among pink flocks. The iris lily forgot to bloom last year as the summer came swift and strong. But this year one eagerly awaited the blooms hiding inside wrinkled leaves of the lily. But the highlight of the early spring is always the appearance of Common jay butterfly, feeding on the nectar of "Curry Leaves" flowers. The Blue pansy also appears sucking in wet mud and taking a break on the Ashoka leaves. The crowning glory of the season this year, was of course our own blue cricket team who lifted the world cup after 28 years!

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Environmental News and Information

Posted by Neil on October 09, 2010

 
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EcoEarth.Info is a one of a kind Environment Portal - with genuine
Internet search, cutting biocentric commentary, social network &
constant news and link tracking - all dedicated to achieving global
environmental sustainability

You may access EcoEarth at: www.EcoEarth.Info

You might also be interested in seeing New Earth Rising a

biocentric e-zine dedicated to knowing Earth's crises, to pursue social change and personal transformation sufficient to achieve global ecological sustainability.

New Earth Rising may be found at: http://www.newearthrising.org/

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Changemakers

Posted by Susan Sharma on June 08, 2010

 
Forum Post
IndianWildlifeClub.com has  entered a competition hosted by Artemisia and Ashoka's Changemakers for "Leveraging Business for Social Change"  and we'd love to get your feedback. 

Ask us a question or post a story about how our portal has impacted you and we'll respond directly on the site.
http://www.changemakers.com/en-us/node/75297

Please go through the above entry tracing the evolution of our club.  Look forward to your feedback

Dr.Susan Sharma

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Butterfly Park in Delhi

Posted by Susan Sharma on May 27, 2007

 
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Encouraged by the number of butterflies visiting the JNU campus, the Jawaharlal Nehru University is all set to develop a Butterfly Park within its premises to attract more species.

More than 50 species of butterflies can be seen fluttering around the University in the Spring season. Rare species like Red Pierrot, Common Jay and Peacock Pansy are often spotted.

Source: The Indian Express, 11 April, 2007

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RED SAND BOA

Posted by aditya on January 03, 2007

 
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Plz inform me what is record size of red sand boa!

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Seething Singur

Posted by Susan Sharma on December 10, 2006

 
Forum Post

The headlines scream of a seething Singur in Calcutta, where Tatamotors are acquiring land to set up an automotive plant. The settlement to the farmers is handsome, yet farmers ask,"What use is cash?"

The echoes of these feelings are heard in a faraway consumeristic land in a different form.  America. 

Americans have increased the conservation of private lands by more than 50 percent in just five years. Currently about 37 million acres of private land has been set aside as natural areas.  Factors contributing to the increase in private lands conservation include towns wanting to preserve their quality of life, state and local open space bond initiatives, and policymakers concerned about sprawl and unchecked development.


Sources: Business Standard, 10 Dec, 2006 and  lta.org/census

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Grameen Bank founder wins Nobel Peace prize

Posted by Susan Sharma on December 07, 2006

 
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The award of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize to Muhammad Yunus is a tremendous accomplishment for the founder of Grameen Bank, Bangladesh and for the field of social entrepreneurship.

The media describes Yunus as an economist, professor, or banker, but really why the Nobel Committee selected him is because Yunus is the quintessential global social entrepreneur. His brilliant microcredit strategy is based on unleashing the potential of every person to change his or her life.

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Increasing Stakes of Local Communities

Posted by Susan Sharma on October 20, 2006

 
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A workshop on `Rising stakes of local community in conservation of forests and wildlife: Institutionalisation of eco-tourism involving local communities' was organised by the Dehradun-based Wildlife Institute of India (WII) and sponsored by the Union Ministry of Environment and Forests at the Periyar Tiger Reserve in Thekkady.

Senior IFS officers noted that though a few States had come out with their own policies on eco-tourism, a national level policy was necessary to address the ecological needs of the forest and environment, create people's involvement giving due regard to their ethnicity and culture so that they feel involved, promoted and empowered. Such a policy would ensure that eco tourism programmes were not hijacked by vested interests.

The forests of the country were burdened with biotic pressure coming from the traditional dependency of the local communities. The traditional type of forest management deprived the local people of any significant stake and role in the protection of the forests. Eco tourism, being a non-consumptive use of the forests, was emerging as an important alternative to strengthen the stakes of local communities for the protection of forests and wildlife.

The officers wanted eco tourism programmes to find a place in forest management and working plan provisions. The thumb rules for an eco tourism programme should be minimum investment on infrastructure, maximum benefit to the local communities, a link between the programme and the local communities and respect to local culture and traditions.

 It was recommended that in ecologically sensitive areas, the principle of high value, high adventure and low volume tourism should be followed.Local communities should have a major role in the implementation of any eco-tourism project. Draft recommendations for a national policy for the implementation of eco-tourism programmes in forest, wildlife and other natural eco-system areas in the country were adopted

Sorce: http://www.hindu.com/2006/10/04/stories/2006100409910400.htm

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A unique solution to Human-Elephant Conflict

Posted by Susan Sharma on September 02, 2006

 
Forum Post

A three phase project to protect  tribals and earmark biologically sustainable forests for an elephant reserve, is taking shape in Chattisgarh. 

'Chhattisgarh has been attracting migratory elephant herds displaced from Jharkhand due to mining and deforestation since the early nineties.  Today the State has about 130 elephants and this has led to frequent man-animal conflicts. 


Helping Chhatisgarh in solving the "HEC' is Mike Pandey, his Earth Matters Foundation and a team of veteran elephant and habitat experts, including former Project Elephant Chief Vinod Rishi. 

The three phase plan involves:


  • Rapid mapping of conflict zones and positioning trained kunki elephants from Southern States or Assam at strategic points so that they can push back wild herds.

  • Short-term study to ascertain location-specific problems and find solutions (electric or chili fencing, dithches, buffer crops, fire crackers) and restructuring compensation models.

  • Long term study to find appropriate forests: possible locations include Timur Pinga, Guru Ghasi das, Badlkhol amd Samer Sot.  Examining the possibilities of insulating breached corridors or creating artificial ones for setting up an elephant reserve and introducing strategic water bodies, elephant- friendly plantations and natural fodder plants in that designated reserve."

(Excerpts Indian Express Sep 1, 2006)

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Human elephant conflict

Posted by Susan Sharma on August 21, 2006

 
Forum Post

" I think that compensation can only be a temporary solution and that too in areas with low levels of conflict. In the long term, we can solve the conflict( or should I say minimise the conflict) only by maintaining the integrity of elephant landscapes. This means that we should begin in earnest the reversal of fragmentation through protection, strengthening or creating corridors. I think the resources are now available but I am not sure about the will"

                                            -Dr Raman Sukumar

 ( Read the full interview at http://www.hindu.com/nic/raman.htm )

 

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