Wildlife

Career in Urban Wildlife

Posted by Jabir Sheikh on October 26, 2020

 
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Wildlife studies has a great scope relating to career. As the UAE CV Maker have said, the biologist from wildlife study the behavior of animals and determines the creature role in our eco system. It is a highly rewarding career. You can earn a lot of money in this field. You get to travel a lot, to the different parts of the world and to the remote places as well. The highest-paid 10% earn more than $98,540 annually, while the lowest-paid 10% of Zoologists earn less than $39,150 annually.

Wildlife

Roadrunner email problems customer help

Posted by Daveheller on July 21, 2020

 
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Roadrunner email is viewed as extraordinary compared to other email and additionally it’s simple to utilize. Roadrunner can be used for both professional and personal use. Technology is growing rapidly, the use of email and security update accordingly. Email is one of the best modes of communication according to individual preferences. To meet the needs of users, Roadrunner mail services must provide uninterrupted email services along with several versatile features. RR email, also known as Time Warner email, which focuses primarily on the needs and preferences of users. It is a mode of communication preferred by the users for both personal and professional usage. But when it comes to technicalities, some roadrunner email problems may arise in Roadrunner mail services. You should connect with our TWC mail Support to resolve these issues instantly.

To read more about TWC email , RR email, and Roadrunner email  support visit the website.

We also provide microsoft 365 help to avail its related services dial office 365 help number. 

 

Also, if you want to have your own Wordpress website and Magento website, you can have sessions with our experts for 30 minutes as free consultation.

 

Reference URL--: https://bit.ly/3hivpd2

 

Wildlife

Ranthambore National National Park Safari Guide

Posted by Deependra Dobriyal on July 17, 2020

 
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Apart from its rich culture, Rajasthan is also popular for its wildlife jungle safari experience in Ranthambore National Park.

The park is an absolute visiting destination amongst the tourists for wild big cats and other species of wild animals, reptiles, and birds.

Due to its huge area, the Ranthambore National Park has been divided into ten zones.

The zones 1 to 5 will take you straight into the middle part of the park and deeper areas of the jungle. Chances are very high that you will be able to see tigers playing with their cubs, drinking water off the lake, and running at a very high speed to catch their prey. 

If you want to witness tigers and other specific species of Tiger, Zone 3 will always top your priority list.

Zone 6 to Zone 10 decreases the chances of spotting tigers but on the other hand, if you anytime prefer to see over 200 species of birds and mammals like Nilgai, Jackals, Hyenas, and other reptiles, one should definitely go for these zones.

Best time to visit Ranthambore National Park:

March to June is the best time to visit if you want to spot Bengal tigers. Although, the temperature is very high during this time. Ranthambore National Park remains closed from July to September end. 

People who love bird-watching can visit during the months of November and December.

Jeep or canter Safari, which one to choose?

A Jeep is a small vehicle that can accommodate 6-8 people at once however, Canter is a larger vehicle in which 20 people can seat at once. Jeep Safari as compared to Canter are a better option so far. However, both vehicles follow the same path in the park.

Ranthambore Safari Timings:

Wildlife safari in Ranthambore National Park is conducted twice every day in the morning and afternoon shifts. Most people love to visit Ranthambore National Park during the winter season as the temperature is suitable compared to summers.

Cost:

Ranthambore Safari's cost is different for Indians and Foreigners. Ranthambore is famous throughout the world of wildlife adventure, and people who come to Rajasthan for adventure never miss Ranthambore.

20-seat open Canter Safari

Canter Safari in Ranthambore National park is the best and safest way to explore the fauna of Park.

  • The cost for Indian Tourists ranges from INR 700 per person.
  • For International Tourists, the price ranges from INR 1400 per person.

6-seater open Jeep Safari

Jeep Safari is the most thrilling way to explore the jungles of Ranthambore National Park. 

  • For Indian Tourists, the cost ranges from INR 1000 per person.
  • For Foreign Tourists, the cost ranges from INR 1850 per person

Book your Jeep Safari here!

How to book a safari online?

To book safari at Ranthambore National Park, you can go to the official website - http://www.tourism.rajasthan.gov.in/ranthambore.html#main_content

There are many websites where you can book your safari. One of them being www.indiathrills.com

You get two options to choose from  Zone 1 to Zone 6 and Zone 7 to Zone 10. (If you select Safari for 1 to 6 Zone that means your safari will be conducted in any one Zone, same as for Zone 7 to 10)

Whatever zone you will go to in all the zones is decided by the computerized system according to availability. It is mandatory to tell your name, age, and I.D card number that you have to show once you reach the park. 

How to Reach:

  • Ranthambore National Park is well-connected with all the major cities of India by Railways and Roads.
  • Nearest Airport- Jaipur Airport (160 K.M)
  • Nearest Railway Station- Sawai Madhopur Railway Station (11 K.M)
  • Nearest Bus Station- Sawai Madhopur Railway Station

Where to stay at Ranthambore?

Ranthambore has many options where you can choose to stay. From Camping resorts to Beautiful and spacious villas everything is there to stay in Madhopur. Choosing your stay destination depends on your budget up to a large extent. You can always enjoy this thrilling adventure with your loved ones without caring about the stay options. 

Have more doubts for Ranthambore National Park, here is the detailed guide for Ranthambore National Park Safari.

Wildlife

Today is the last date for Wildlife Week-celebrated annually

Posted by Susan Sharma on October 04, 2019

 
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During wildlife week October, 2019, here is some food for thought for all IWC members.

 

Wildlife Humour

A chat session with BNHS education officer

Wildlife

Wildlife Experience at Kaziranga National Park, Assam, India

Posted by himalayan outback on July 19, 2019

 
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The Kaziranga National Park boasts of the largest population of the world’s endangered “one horned Indian rhinoceros”. The Park also sustains half the world’s population of genetically pure Wild Water Buffaloes, Wild elephants and perhaps the densest population of tigers. It is also a bird watcher’s paradise and home to some 500 species of birds – The Crested Serpent Eagle, Palla’s Fishing Eagle, Greyheaded Fishing Eagle, Swamp Partridge, Bar-headed goose, Whistling Teal, Bengal Florican, Storks, Herons and Pelicans are some of the species found here

This trip is an easy extension to anyone visiting Arunachal or Assam in North East India.Himalayanoutback kaziranga-national-park-safari

Wildlife

Stay Close To Nature At Jim Corbett National park

Posted by Anjalipal on May 07, 2019

 
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In India, Jim Corbett National Park is the largest national wildlife park. The park was initially named as Hailey National Park. The first national park of India gained its popularity for its Project Tiger.

https://www.corbettnationalpark.com/project-tiger.html

Under this project, the park is also named as Tiger reserve of India. India wildlife park is mainly formed to save Royal Bengal Tiger by providing it the compatible environment in which tigers can survive. Along with endangered species of Tiger, we can also see the rare varieties of wild animals in Corbett National Park - like Asiatic elephants, One-horned Rhino, Blackbuck, crocodiles, alligators, etc around 500 species of migratory birds can also be seen at the banks of Kosi and Ramganga rivers. Wildlife in a national park is so vast that many kinds of mammals, reptiles, crustaceans, birds, amphibians, fishes, etc are present. A wide range of flora also exists in this jungle. The varied variety of herbs, shrubs, climbers, creepers, flowering plants, trees inhabitant the forest. 

https://www.corbettnationalpark.com/resorts-in-corbett.html

Nature loving people should visit Jim Corbett National Park to relax mind and soul. Enjoy holidays at this wildlife park in India. At corbettnationalpark.com we provide you best packages in resorts and hotels along with adventure activities if you like.

Wildlife

Bird Feeding, Bird Bath | Nature Forever

Posted by Kaushal Desai on April 14, 2019

 
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Bird Feeding, Bird Bath | Nature Forever

In this summer don’t forget to feed and give appropriate water to wildlife. Especially, water is one of the most important things birders can add to their backyard to attract birds. All bird species need water, and adding one or more water features to your yard will quickly attract feathered friends.  Birds need water for two reasons: drinking and preening. Water helps keep a bird’s body cool both from the inside and outside. Water baths can also remove dust, loose feathers, parasites and other debris from a bird’s plumage. Offering water in your backyard will attract more birds than just food sources, since birds that would not normally visit feeders can be tempted by water features.  Any water is an improvement on a dry backyard, but moving water will attract more birds because the motion catches their eye and they can hear any dripping, sprinkles or splashes. Apologies for not using original video sounds as its got windy sound so much in recording. 

Hope you liked this video. Keep Nature alive and fruitful 😇

email: kaushaldesai123@gmail.com 

 

Other related video:

 

House Sparrow (Bird Lover - Short Film)(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DqWjAretpNs&t=4s)B

BabySparrow (https://youtu.be/MwUrYzTpEL)

Wildlife

Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary-Himalayan Monal

Posted by Susan Sharma on March 16, 2019

 
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Is the Himalayan Monal the Peacock of the Hills?

 

Watch our trip report to Kedarnath Wildlife Sanctuary and Sarahan at the

https://youtu.be/5DMmzNTOrzY

Wildlife

First release of captive-bred* vultures in Asia

Posted by Susan Sharma on September 19, 2018

 
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First release of captive-bred* vultures in Asia


Nepal and SAVE witnessed a further landmark for Asian vulture conservation on 17th September 2018, when the Government of Nepal and national and international conservation organisations released 12 critically endangered white-rumped vultures Gyps bengalensis, including the first eight birds actually hatched within the conservation breeding programme. Releases last year of birds reared (but not hatched) in the programme have so far shown very promising signs of survival and success, and in addition, 20 wild birds have now been satellite-tagged  - 11 in 2017, and a further 9 just prior to this release.


The first gate opens and several birds immediately joined the wild birds at the carcass outside. Photo: BCN

The work is a truly collaborative effort of many partners, led by Bird Conservation Nepal (BCN) and the National Trust for Nature Conservation (NTNC) together with Chitwan National Park and the Department of National Parks & Wildlife Conservation (DNPWC). The Director General of DNPWC and a small group of officials, scientists and community leaders watched as the BCN team quietly opened the doors of the release aviary using a remote pulley system. Six of the twelve vultures exited the release aviary and joined the wild birds feeding on the buffalo carcass almost immediately, and all twelve came out within half an hour. Six of the birds later returned inside the aviary where they spent the night, but immediately flew out again the following morning. The release site is at the village of Pithauli, Nawalparasi, close to Nepal’s Chitwan National Park.

“This is a world first for the release of white-rumped vultures actually bred in the Nepal breeding centre and is a major step for establishing secure wild populations now that we are confident that the veterinary use of diclofenac has been stopped in this country” said Mr Man Bahadur Khadka, DG, DNPWC.

The previous week, an expert team from the UK (Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) and Forestry Commission) together with the BCN team had fitted satellite tags to the birds with carefully designed harnesses (using the thoracic cross-hatch method), ready so they can be monitored after the release, and give us vital information about their movements, and any problems or causes of mortality . The team also caught and tagged nine wild white-rumped vultures, which are already being monitored, to compare their movements and behaviour with the released birds.


Fitting the satellite tag and wing-tags a week before the release. Photo: BCN

“The monitoring of the satellite-tagged birds is an important way to understand how well the birds are surviving, and to assess the safety of the “Vulture Safe Zone” said Ishana Thapa, CEO of BCN.  “If these and the previously tagged birds all survive then this is a further sign that the vulture conservation efforts are working”. Krishna Bhusal, BCN’s Vulture Conservation Program Officer of BCN added: “Releasing vultures, hatched in captivity, in this location, combines our in situ and ex situ efforts to save these birds, and the process of keeping the birds in the pre-release aviary for several months before release allows them to adjust and interact with wild birds - This is an exciting day for me and all Nepal”.


The officials slowly open the first gate of the release aviary using the remote pulley. Photo: BCN

Chitwan’s Chief Conservation Officer, Bed Kumar Dhakal said “We are proud that the vulture breeding at the Breeding Centre in Chitwan National Park has taken off, with nine chicks last year and six more in 2018”.  Jemima Parry Jones, UK birds of prey expert from the International Centre for Birds of Prey (ICBP) who advises the project said “Breeding and releasing these birds is a great credit to all involved, and shows how a combination of international and national partners can work successfully together to achieve very significant results. The huge success of the VSZs has meant we can have these amazing releases and aim towards all the vultures being back out in the wild by 2023”. Craig Pritchard, senior vet representing ZSL said how the birds all appeared to be in very good condition, and how pleased and privileged he felt to be part of this joint collaborative effort.


Briefing and speeches of the release immediately beforehand. Photo: BCN

Mr DB Choudhary, the local conservation community leader added “The Nawalparasi community is proud that their area has been selected for this historic release, following a series of vulture conservation initiatives in the area including running the vulture-safe feeding site here since 2006”

Chris Bowden, RSPB and Saving Asia’s Vultures from Extinction (SAVE) Programme Manager said “The successful removal of veterinary diclofenac across Nepal thanks to a lot of hard work, is the real reason behind the success so far and without this we couldn’t have gone ahead. These are the first ever Asian vultures to have been hatched and bred within a breeding programme and taken to the concluding phase of release to the wild. This illustrates the rationale behind these efforts and if enough birds survive without encountering killer veterinary drugs, we will be on track to release all the birds by 2023”

The vulture conservation work in Nepal is carried out with the full support of DNPWC, and led by BCN. The breeding centre was established in 2008 and is jointly managed by NTNC and Chitwan National Park. The main funding (and technical) support has come from the RSPB, but significant resources also come from all organisations involved as well as the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) who provide veterinary support and helped with funds for the release aviary, and the International Centre for Birds of Prey (ICBP) in the UK.


Flying free. Photo: Rajendra Gurung BCN

Calendar of the Nepal white-rumped vulture release programme so far:

April 2017: Transfer of the first 6 captive-reared* birds from the breeding centre to the release aviary.                                                  Trapped, satellite-tagged and released 6 wild white-rumped vultures

November 2017: First release of 6 captive-reared birds.  (Note five of the six released birds still alive and well after 10 months, but one was lost, possibly predated by a leopard)

Caught and tagged 5 more wild birds.

April 2018: Transferred 12 vultures from the breeding centre to the release aviaries.

September 2018: Released the first 8 captive-bred birds*, plus a further 4 captive-reared birds.                                                                        Also tagged and released 9 more wild birds.

There is now a total of 37 satellite tagged white rumped vultures, 20 wild birds and 17 released. All were caught or released in Nawalparasi in Nepal.

*Captive reared vultures are birds that came in as chicks collected from wild nests (in 2009 and 2010) reared and placed in the breeding centre for the breeding programme.

* Captive bred vultures are the offspring of those captive reared birds, hatched and parent reared in the breeding programme.


For more information on the Saving Asia’s Vultures from Extinction (SAVE) partnership and further news updates check www.save-vultures.org  and www.birdlifenepal.org

Wildlife

Wildlife Conservation as a career choice

Posted by Susan Sharma on September 12, 2018

 
Forum Post

Many IWC members send queries about wildlife conservation as a career choice.   Many youngsters have great passion but find there is a lack of opportunities to qualify with an"appropriate" degree.   There is also a lack of openings in general.  

I recently interviewed Shaleen Attre, a passionate wildlife lover.  With no "Science background" she found it impossible to get admission for any environmental degree courses in India.   Her vast field experience working with NGOs in wildlife area did not count when it came to admission.

Here is the video recording. Watch it at the link

https://youtu.be/y5Nw5-aKO78

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